The 8 best stretches and exercises for Triceps

The triceps brachii, or more commonly known just as the triceps, are located at the back of the arm and is the major muscle in the extension of the elbow, or straightening the arm. Triceps brachii muscle means “three-headed arm” muscle as it originates in three places, attaching at the scapula (shoulder blade) and at two places at the top of the humerus (arm bone). The three heads act in varying movements of the upper arm and elbow, but with its origin on the scapula, the long head also acts on the shoulder joint and is also involved in backward rotation and adduction of the arm. The muscle inserts in just below the elbow at the olecranon of ulnar.

Injury to the triceps can cause a range of symptoms including;

Pain patterns for tricep trigger points

Back of Arm Pain
Back of Shoulder Pain
Dorsal Forearm Pain
Upper Thoracic Back Pain
Volar Finger Pain

Less commonly;
Front of Arm Pain
Lateral Epicondylar Pain
Medial Epicondylar Pain
Olecranon Pain [1]

Your massage therapist will likely work the triceps in conjunction with other muscles in the area such as the biceps, muscles of the forearm and muscles of the rotator cuff, depending on where your pain is.

Stretching Triceps

Tricep stretch

The best way to stretch triceps is to reach up with you the arm you want to stretch, bend at the elbow, and reach over with your other hand and grasp your elbow on the top, so your palm faces down towards the mid-back.

If your flexibility is not good enough to be able to reach your elbow with the opposite hand, have a towel in the hand of the affected side, and reach the bottom of the towel with the other hand at the back of the body. Gently tug the towel down while gripping.

A cross body stretch will also stretch the long head of the triceps. Reach your straight arm across the body and use the other arm to create tension and support the elbow.

Strengthening Triceps

Exercising the triceps directly will achieve the best results, with compound movements.


Close Grip Bench Press

  1. Lie on a flat bench with your feet flat on the floor. Make sure your back is completely flat on the bench, with no “arching” of your spine.
  2. Grip the barbell with an overhand grip, shoulder width or slightly less than shoulder width apart. (Do not make your grip too narrow as it limits stability of the barbell which can lead to injury)
  3. Push up using your chest and shoulders to lift the barbell above your body, then lower it slowly ( a count of 2) towards the centre of your chest. Hold for a count of one.
  4. Without “bouncing” the weight, force the barbell back up over the middle of your chest, straightening your arms and locking your elbows once your arms are fully straight. Hold for a count of one.
  5. Repeat.

Tricep Dips

  1. To get into the starting position, hold your body at arm’s length with your arms nearly locked above the bars.
  2. Now, inhale and slowly lower yourself downward. Your torso should remain upright and your elbows should stay close to your body. This helps to better focus on tricep involvement. Lower yourself until there is a 90 degree angle formed between the upper arm and forearm.
  3. Then, exhale and push your torso back up using your triceps to bring your body back to the starting position.
  4. Repeat the movement for the prescribed amount of repetitions.

Overhead Extensions

  1. Sit on a bench with back support.
  2. Grip a dumbbell at one end using both hands. Your palms should be facing inward.
  3. Hold the dumbbell overhead with your arms fully extended.  This is the the start position.
  4. Keep your upper arms close to your head (biceps roughly level with your temples) and near to 90degrees to the floor.
  5. Moving only your forearms, lower the dumbbell in a smooth arc behind your head until your forearms and biceps touch. Hold for a count of one.
  6. Return to the start position by using the triceps to extend your arm and raise the dumbbell. Exhale as you do this.
  7. Repeat.

Lying Chest Overhead Extensions

  1. Lie on a flat bench, holding a barbell on your chest with an overhand grip. (Your hands should be shoulder width apart)
  2. Get into starting position, raising the bar above your chest by extending your arms, but do NOT lock your elbows.
  3. Keeping your arms slightly bent, slower lower the weight in a smooth arc to a position behind your head by rotating your shoulders. (as if putting your hands in the air)
  4. Keep moving the barbell behind your head until you feel a slight stretch in your chest. Hold for a count of one.
  5. Return to the start position in a smooth revers arc.
  6. Continue holding the weight above your chest, then repeat.

Tricep Cable Rope Push /Pull Downs

  1. Set up a cable station with a straight bar on attached to the top pulley.
  2. Grip the bar with an overhand grip,with your hands slightly less than shoulder width apart.
  3. Position your feet shoulder width apart,with knees slightly bent for stability.
  4. Pull the bar down until your forearms are parallel to the floor with your elbows close to your body and your wrists locked in a straight position. This is your staring point.
  5. Moving only your forearms, push the bar down towards the floor until your arms are fully extended and you feel a stretch in your triceps. Hold for a count of one and squeeze your triceps.
  6. Return to the start position moving your forearms only. Hold for a count of one then repeat. [2]

The Stress of Lower Back Pain

What is lower back pain?

Unfortunately this isn’t a question that really needs to be greatly expanded on, as most of us have experienced some lower back pain at one time or another. It is said to be the second most common complaint heard by physicians in the US. It is usually experienced in the lumbar region of the spine. The lumbar region consists of five vertebrae (L1 to L5) between the lower ribs and the sacrum. The complex anatomy of the lumbar spine is a remarkable combination of these strong vertebrae, multiple bony elements linked by joint capsules, and flexible ligaments/tendons, large muscles, and highly sensitive nerves.[1]

What causes lower back pain?

There are a number of aggravating factors when it comes to lower back pain, including; physiological, environmental and personal factors.

Physiological conditions

Disc herniation can put pressure on the nerves branching from the spine

Diagnosable conditions of the lower back include but aren’t limited to; degenerative disc disease, ruptured or herniated disc, spinal compression fractures, spinal stenosis, sciatica, spondylolithesis, scoliosis, arthritis or other non-musculoskeletal causes such as kidney stones, shingles, or infection.

However, it has been proven that of all lower back complaints, as few as 1% of them are diagnosable.[2]

Meaning that more than 90% of all lower back complaints are ‘non-specific’, and inexplicable by medical imaging or testing. There is little doubt that muscular and myofascial pain is a major factor in non-specific lower back pain and orthopaedic testing by a physical therapist such as massage or myotherapist should be able to locate the muscle or ligament acting as the cause.

What causes non-specific lower back pain?

Strain to the muscles in the lower back can cause lower back pain

Initially lower back pain is likely to be triggered by a physiological factor, such as sprain or strain to ligament or muscles in the lower back. This could happen through improper or over use of the muscle or joint, irregular exercise, or poor posture. However, stress is such a big factor in exacerbating lower back pain that even the medical research is saying that the best treatments include mindfulness and movement, over medication.

What are those stressors?

Environmental factors

Environmental stressors that can attribute to causing low back pain may include employment, relationships and the external demands of life such as;

  • Noise – loud and constant low level noise
  • Pollution
  • Trauma
  • Injury
  • Foreign organisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi)
  • Toxins
  • Poor work conditions (low satisfaction, poor ergonomics, too much noise, poor air circulation, lack of privacy, excess demands, etc).
  • Relationships with others; bullying in the workplace, demanding family member, abusive relationship
  • Living situation
  • All the situations, challenges, difficulties, and expectations we are confronted with on a daily basis.

Stressful work environment can lead to exacerbated pain

Personal Factors

Internal stress comes from inside of us and determine our body’s ability to respond to, and deal with, the external stress-inducing factors or stressors:

  • Nutritional status
  • Attitudes & belief system
  • Thoughts
  • Feelings of anger, fear and worry
  • Anticipation
  • Imagination
  • Memory
  • Overall health and fitness levels
  • Presence of illness and infection
  • Emotional well-being
  • Amount of sleep and rest you get.

“Evidence suggests that fear avoidance beliefs are prognostic for poor outcome in subacute lower back pain.” [3] That is, those in fear of pain are likely to take longer to recover.

The fear of pain was assessed in 126 volunteers with a questionnaire before “inducing muscle injury to the shoulder.” The results found evidence that fear of pain before injury can predict recovery time. In other words: how well you respond to injury and recover is affected enough by fear that it can actually be predicted by measuring fear beforehand.[4]

Pain itself often modifies the way the central nervous system works, so that a patient actually becomes more sensitive and gets more pain with less provocation. It’s called “central sensitization” because it involves changes in the central nervous system (CNS) in particular — the brain and the spinal cord. Sensitized patients are not only more sensitive to things that should hurt, but sometimes to ordinary touch and pressure as well. Their pain also “echoes,” fading more slowly than in other people.[5]

Watch this great TED talk on ‘Why Things Hurt”

How is lower back pain diagnosed?

To diagnose the cause of low back pain, it is likely you will go through a series of diagnostic tests from your GP and then perhaps a series orthopaedic tests from your physical therapist. Imaging and blood tests will not show soft tissue injury, such as ligament sprain or muscle strain, so it is a good option to see a physical therapist if your tests come back negative.

Orthopaedic tests will include a range of simple postural back and leg tests to determine joints, ligaments and/or muscles that may be implicated in your pain. Communicate openly as best you can with your physical therapist about what you feel and when you feel it. If this is not completely obvious to you, then keep a pain diary, noting down when and where on your body you feel the pain, and what you have been doing in the time leading up to the pain. It’s also worth noting the external and environmental factors that might be surrounding the pain at the time. There’s even an ‘app for that’.[6] The therapist is looking for the actions and muscles that recreate the pain you are experiencing.

How is the best way to treat it?

Well, I guess that is the million-dollar question…


“For people with chronic low back pain, opioid analgesics provide modest short term pain relief but the effect is not likely to be clinically important within guideline recommended doses. Evidence on long-term efficacy is lacking, the efficacy of opioid analgesics on acute low back pain is unknown.” Unfortunately, the overuse of imaging, opioids, and surgery remains a widespread problem.[7] If pharmacological treatment is desired, clinicians and patients should select non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or skeletal muscle relaxants.

Exercise, Physical Therapy & Mindfulness

Lower back massage

The reality is that medical research is now saying, the best medicine is no medicine. The evidence indicates that medication is found to reduce pain by approximately 10%, while a systematic review and meta-analysis of yoga for low back pain found there is strong evidence for short-term effects on pain (as much as 48% reduction) and long-term effect on pain (a reduction of 33%).[8]

The conclusion is that for patients with acute, sub-acute and chronic low back pain, clinicians and patients should initially select non-pharmacological treatment including exercise like yoga or tai chi, multidisciplinary rehabilitation including massage, spinal manipulation and acupuncture, and mindfulness based stress reduction such as cognitive behavioural therapy.[9]











5 things you didn’t know could be caused by muscle pain

Most massage therapists and myotherapists treat taut bands of muscle and what they call myofascial trigger points, or what you might know as ‘knots’ in the muscle. Also known as trigger points, they are described as hyperirritable spots in the fascia surrounding skeletal muscle. They are associated with palpable nodules in taut bands of muscle fibres. There is little science around what causes these trigger points, or how they can be medically diagnosed, as they cannot be seen in medical imaging. As a result, the misdiagnosis of myofascial pain is prevalent.

The misdiagnosis of pain is the most important issue taken up by Travell and Simons, the clinical physicians who coined the term, trigger point. Referred pain from trigger points mimics the symptoms of a very long list of common maladies, but physicians, in weighing all the possible causes for a given condition, rarely consider a myofascial source. The study of trigger points has not historically been part of medical education. Travell and Simons hold that most of the common everyday pain is caused by myofascial trigger points and that ignorance of that basic concept could inevitably lead to false diagnoses and the ultimate failure to deal effectively with pain. [1]

Below are just five symptoms of myofascial pain. If you’ve explored other options with your GP, with no results, consider checking with your massage therapist to see if myofascial tension could be the cause…

  1. Earaches, Ringing (Tinnitus) or Itchy ears
    These muscles in the front of the neck, jaw and face join in around the base of the ear and can lead to ear pain, feeling of itchiness or create a ringing in the ear.

Sternocleidomastoid or SCM for short, has a whole list of symptoms it can cause when it is tight and has active trigger points, including sinusitis-like symptoms, dizziness after whiplash injury, sore throat, temple or frontal headache, dry cough and nasal drip. Tension in SCM in combination with tension in the masseter and pterygoid muscles, that help you chew, can lead to ear pain.

Massage through the front of the neck and jaw can ease these symptoms.

  1. Rapid, Fluttery, Irregular Heartbeat or Heart Attack-like Pain
    Muscles in the chest, including the sternalis and pectorial major, can cause pain in the chest. While trigger points in the scalenes, at the front of the neck can cause referral pain in the chest and arm. Tension in these muscles can lead to pain that emulates heart palpitations or heart attack. However, if you are having these symptoms, please call emergency and be cleared for any heart problems first before you think about having a massage.

  2. Irritable Bowel
    Trigger points in the lateral abdominal obliques can cause dysfunction of the muscle and inhibit the function of the bowels.
    While dysfunction of the multifidi of the lumber spine can cause dysfunction of the pelvic floor muscles that control bowel and bladder movements.
    Massage to the abdomen can help get the muscles back to normal function and relieve active trigger points that may be causing pain and dysfunction.
    One way to help recruit and strengthen the lumbar multifidus muscles is by tensing the pelvic floor muscles for a few seconds “as if stopping urination midstream”.[2]
  1. Stress Incontinence or Anal/Genital/Perineal pain
    Stress incontinence is a condition (found chiefly in women) in which there is involuntary emission of urine when pressure within the abdomen increases suddenly, as in coughing or jumping.
    Stress on the adductor magnus, piriformis and pelvic floor muscles can often occur during childbirth, or exercise. These muscles are on the inside of the thigh, in the deep gluteals/hip rotators and the distal floor of the pelvis respectively.
    The pelvic floor is important in providing support for pelvic organs, such as the bladder, intestines, the uterus and in maintenance of continence as part of the urinary and anal sphincters. It facilitates birth by resisting the descent of the presenting part, causing the foetus to rotate forwards to navigate through the pelvic girdle. It helps maintain optimal intra-abdominal pressure.[3]
    Massage can be performed through the adductor magnus and piriformis. Your massage or physical therapist can teach self-massage to you for the pelvic floor, stretches and exercises to help ease tension in all of these muscles.

Easy Stretches to Relax the Pelvis – Women

  1. Menstrual or Pelvic Pain
    Similarly, the muscles around the pelvic floor, deep glutes, sacrum and abdominals can cause menstrual or pelvic pain. Some abdominal massage, self massage to the pelvic floor and stretches and exercises can aid in releasing these muscles to ease menstrual pain.

Please remember, that although muscular pain can lead to a range of symptoms, to check with your GP or health physician first to rule out any other cause.

Three things your massage therapist will always tell you

If you’ve injured yourself there are a number of things that your massage therapist will tell you to do after your massage, but there are three things they will always tell you in order to help you get better;


  1. Stretch

If you’ve injured yourself or you have chronic muscular pain and tension, stretching is a really great way to ease that tension and manage the pain. It will almost certainly speed up your recovery.

And you know, we can tell when you’re not doing them!


2. Rest

If you’ve injured yourself during a specific activity, particularly during sport, it’s a good idea to rest that part of the body. If you’ve injured your shoulder at the gym, then make this week, leg week. If you’re doing a repetitive task at work, ask your manager to change your duties or switch to light duties. It’s important to rest your injury, to enable it to heal, otherwise you may just be exacerbating the issue.

3. Follow up

Even if you feel better, please have your follow up within 5 to 10 days of your initial appointment. There is often still tension there, even if those trigger points have been eased. If you are still tight, and return to the activity that caused the injury, the trigger points, and pain is likely to return too.

If you have that follow up the week after, you are likely to stay pain free for longer, and that is every massage therapists goal for you!


Four easy exercises to ease Achilles tendonitis

What is Achilles tendonitis?
Achilles tendonitis (also known as Achilles tendonitis, Achilles tendinitis, Achilles tendon pain, Achilles tendinosis, Achilles tendinopathy) is inflammation of the Achilles tendon. The Achilles tendon is a tough band of fibrous tissue that connects the calf muscles to the heel bone (calcaneus). The Achilles tendon is also called the calcaneal tendon. The gastrocnemius and soleus muscles (calf muscles) unite into one band of tissue, which becomes the Achilles tendon at the low end of the calf. [1]

Anatomy of the heel

How do you get Achilles tendonitis?

Achilles tendonitis is an overuse injury that can occur with over training or poor biomechanics due to anatomy or poor footwear.

Common causes of Achilles tendonitis include;

  • Over-training or unaccustomed use – “too much too soon”
  • Sudden change in training surface, such as grass to bitumen
  • Flat (over-pronated) feet
  • High foot arch with tight Achilles tendon
  • Tight hamstring (back of thigh) and calf muscles
  • Toe walking (or constantly wearing high heels)
  • Poor footwear
  • Hill running
  • Poor eccentric strength [2]

Excessive high heel wearing can lead to Achilles tendonitis

What are the signs and symptoms of Achilles tendonitis?
The main signs and symptoms of Achilles tendonitis are pain in the Achilles area, particularly on walking/running and swelling around the back of the heel and Achilles tendon. Other symptoms include tight calf muscles, poor range of motion in the calf and ankle and the feeling of heat or burning in the heel.

Who gets Achilles tendonitis?
Achilles tendonitis is a very common runner injury . It can however, also affect athletes, basketballers, dancers, or people who put a lot of repeated stress on their feet.

Those with an over-pronating gait due to high foot arches can often be inflicted with chronic Achilles tendonitis and have to manage the injury for life.

How is Achilles tendonitis treated?
Most cases of Achilles tendonitis can be treated at home before it gets too severe.

Use the RICER formula:

  • RestDon’t exercise for a few days, or try an exercise that doesn’t stress your feet, such as swimming.
  • IceApply an ice pack wrapped in a towel or a cold compress to your tendon for 10 minutes or more after you exercise or if you feel pain in the tendon.
  • CompressUse tape or an athletic wrap to keep swelling down and help support and immobilise the tendon.
  • ElevateLie down and raise your foot above the level of your heart, and if possible, try to sleep with your foot elevated. This will help keep the swelling to a minimum.
  • Refer: See a physical therapist, such as a podiatrist and a massage therapist for treatment
  • Take anti-inflammatory medications. Pain relievers like ibuprofen can help ease pain and reduce swelling in the short term.
  • Stretch and exercise your ankles and calf muscles while you recover. Keeping your muscles, tendons, and ligaments strong and flexible will aid in your recovery and help you keep from re-injuring your Achilles tendon. A physical therapist can help you come up with a good exercise program.
  • Prescription orthotics. Orthotics can be helpful if you have poor biomechanics. Talk to your GP or a podiatrist to find out if they might work for you.
  • Massage. Remedial massage can help manage the muscle tension in the hamstrings and calves and help reduce swelling around the Achilles tendon [3]

What stretches should I do for Achilles tendonitis?

Calf Stretch: Place your hands on a wall with one leg straight and the heel to the ground. Place the other leg, with the knee bent, in front of the straight leg and push your hips toward the wall. Stretch your calf to the point where you feel a strong pull but no pain. Do not let your heels come off the ground. Hold the position for 20-30 seconds, and then relax. Repeat 3 times on each foot in a slow controlled manner.

The same stretch can be repeated, with both front and back knees bent.

Straight Leg Calf Stretch

Seated Heel Raises: Sit on a chair and raise your toes up as high as you can without pain. Slowly lower your heels. Do 5 repetitions, 4 times a day. You can gradually increase the intensity, as you get stronger by holding a weight on your thighs.

Seated Calf Raise

Following are some other exercises you can do, but they should be done under the supervision of a physical therapist, at least initially, because they could damage the Achilles tendon if they’re not done correctly:

Bilateral Heel Drop:  Stand at the edge of a stair or a raised platform that is stable. Put the front part of each foot on the stair. This position allows your heel to move up and down without hitting the stair. Hold on to a railing or support to help your balance.

Slowly lift your heels off the ground and slowly lower your heels to the lowest point possible. Be sure to do this in a controlled manner 20 times. You can also do this starting on the floor rather than the stair.

Unilateral (Single Leg) Heel Drop: This is similar to the bilateral heel drop except it’s done on one leg while the other leg is bent. Raise your heel off the ground and slowly lower it down. Do it in a slow controlled manner. Then switch to the other leg. [4]

Unilateral Heel Drop


















Remedial massage now available at Real Fit Malvern East

It is with great excitement that I inform you, as of start of February 2018 remedial massage will be available from the new location of Real Fit Personal Training, 135 Waverley Road, Malvern East.

Just 3km from my current location, with tram access and street parking out the front, I will be available on Tuesdays and Fridays from 10:30am to 7pm. My contact details have not changed. You can still book online or call me to book on 0450 721 661.

Since I opened in Malvern East, your loyal support has helped my business grow, and now I need a more accessible space to serve you better. I have been looking for a new home for the past few months and I’m happy to say that I’ve found a friendly and welcoming local environment at Real Fit to work from.

If you have any questions about the new location or my services, please call and I’ll be happy to help. I look forward to seeing you at Real Fit!

*Sale* 20% off Gift Certificates

Still looking for the perfect gift for that special someone, or perhaps the person who has is all…

Between now and Christmas Day I am offering 20% off all gift certificates*

To purchase please click on the Gift Certificate menu and choose from relaxation or remedial massage.

Each treatment is tailored to the clients specific needs, whether it is treating muscular pain and dysfunction or an hour of total relaxation. All treatments are suitable during pregnancy.

Also, please remember you can book online and to like my Facebook page to keep up to date with my services and offers.


*Gift certificates are valid for 12 months from date of purchase. They must be produced as payment at the time of the appointment and cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer.

Muscle in focus: Hamstrings

The hamstrings

I know I call this ‘muscle in focus’ but the hamstrings is really a group of muscles, three to be precise. At the back of the thigh, between the hip and the knee, semimembranosus, semitendinosus and biceps femoris all have two main actions, extension of the hip and flexion of the knee. They play a crucial role in standing up, walking, running, jumping… and are the major antagonist of the quadraceps. [1]

They are also the most injured muscles in the body.

Hamstring muscle injury is a common athletic injury, particularly for runners, running & jumping athletes like footballers, long & high jumpers, and dancers.

The most common cause of a muscle or tendon strain is overuse, which weakens the tissue fibers. Muscles and joints may also be forced to perform movements for which they are not prepared or designed, over stretching and potentially damaging the surrounding muscle or tendon. An injury can occur from a single stressful incident, or it may gradually arise after many repetitions of a motion. [2]

The word “ham” is derived from the Old English ham or hom meaning the hollow or bend of the knee, from a Germanic base where it meant “crooked”. … String refers to tendons, and thus, the hamstrings are the string-like tendons felt on either side of the back of the knee.

Injuries to the hamstring group of muscles can range from a minor strain to a major rupture. A minor or grade I tear to a hamstring will most likely heal with a small amount of physical therapy, such as massage and dry needling. A major, grade III tear or full rupture could be a major disruption to an athletes sporting career and may require surgery.

World Athletics Championships, 2017

Even someone at an Olympic level like sprinter Usain Bolt is not immune to injury, tearing his hamstring in the World Athletics Championships earlier this year.

How do they happen?

At the knee, these muscles act to slow down your leg as it swings forward very quickly during in preparation for footstrike. It’s this action that commonly leads to injuries because the muscle is trying to shorten and contract, but the knee is extending very quickly, which pulls on the hamstring and creates a tremendous amount of strain.

At the hip, these powerful muscles generate force just prior to the foot coming off of the ground as they extend the hip backwards. Injuries can occur at this point of the running cycle because these muscles are generating tremendous amounts of force to maintain, or increase, forward running velocity. [3]

What are the symptoms?

You don’t have to be an elite athlete to injure the hamstring. Over use, misuse and lack of stretching or massage can put you at risk. Even tight quadraceps can contribute to tight hamstrings.

Symptoms of a strained or torn hamstring could include sudden and severe pain during exercise, along with a snapping or popping feeling in the area, pain in the back of the thigh and lower buttock when walking, straightening the leg, or bending over; tenderness; bruising in the area. [4]

In severe cases, you can tear your hamstring from its point of origin on the ischial tuberosity (sit bones). This is called a hamstring origin avulsion. In extreme cases, an avulsion fracture will occur where the hamstring muscle tears the bone where it attaches off your pelvis. This happens after a sudden and forceful eccentric contraction of your hamstrings with your hip flexed, for example, when hurdling or performing the splits. When this occurs, it is necessary to undergo surgery in order to reattach the bones.  [5]

How is it treated?

If you feel you have strained or torn a hamstring muscle, the first thing to do is R.I.C.E.R. – Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevate and Refer, as in refer to a health care practitioner.

The risk of hamstring injury can be reduced with a regular stretching program and exercises. However, a strained or torn hamstring will need soft tissue therapy, some biomechanical assessment to find the cause of the injury, heat & ice therapy and stretching. Once the pain has eased, the muscle will benefit from gentle exercise and a strengthening program.

Static hamstring stretch

Straight leg hamstring stretch

Lying on your back, raise your leg straight up until you feel the tug of the muscle. Don’t over stretch or force the stretch. If you feel numbness in your foot, ease the stretch off a fraction until the numbness subsides.

Breathe deeply and hold the stretch for 30 seconds. Lower the leg and rest for 10 seconds. Repeat each leg 3 times.

If you need to support the leg, use a towel or belt looped around the arch of the foot.


To increase flexibility

Lie on the floor in a doorway or close to a corner of a wall.

Place one leg up against the wall, the other is straight on the floor and your buttock is as close as possible to the door frame or wall.

Extend the elevated leg and pull your toe own as much as possible until you feel a stretch behind your thigh.

Hold the stretch for between 10 and 30 seconds.

Active Stretch

If you’re a particularly flexible person, but still have tight hamstrings, you could benefit from an active stretch.

Lie face up with a theraband around the arch of the foot to be stretched. Bend this knee. Hold the stretch theraband in one hand, arm straight. Stabilize the thigh with the other hand.

Exhale, straighten the knee while lifting up on the theraband, until extended.

Lower the leg and repeat 5 times. Finish with a static stretch.

Foam rolling

Place a foam roller on the floor and sit on the floor supporting yourself with your hands.

Place the back of one thigh over the foam roller and the other leg on the floor for support. Support your core and have proper low back posture during the exercise.

Gearing up for summer: Summer Specials

From now until the end of February I will be offering some special add on treatments especially for summer.

Getting a sunless tan?

Dry Exfoliation tools

Good for you, it’s the healthiest way to look sunkist!

Add-on a 15 minute full body dry exfoliation to your 1 hour full body relaxation massage. You’ll be exfoliated and moisturised, ready for a tan!

Don’t forget to book your massage a day or so before your tan, so that no oil remains on your skin when get your sunless tan.

Getting bikini ready?

Summer Ready?

Book a 45 minute Manual Lymphatic Drainage treatment with a 15 minute cupping add-on to help reduce the appearance of cellulite.

Cupping can release the tension in the fascial layer between the skin and muscle that can create the rippled effect of cellulite. While lymphatic drainage helps drain excess fluid that may be retained in those areas.

In a 1 hour treatment, two adjacent areas of the body can be targeted; such as the buttocks and back of thighs or stomach and front of thighs. The use of silicone rubber cups means minimal marking and you can get into that bikini within a few days.

I recommend between two and four weekly treatments for best results.

Book 4 treatments for the price of 3!

To book: click Book Now and look for the Summer Special option.
Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any queries about treatments or what might be best for you.